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Recently Recognized Neurogenic Cough

Neurogenic Cough is a recently recognized type of cough. This new way of thinking has implications for cough diagnosis, cough therapy, and cough resolution. Neurogenic Cough describes people who are hard-wired and hot-wired to cough.  Different triggers contribute to cough, but renowned Center for Cough expert Dr. Mandel Sher observes that hypersensitive throat nerve endings are often the primary source of cough. Cough may be the symptom of inflamed throat nerve endings.  If a person is set-up to cough, then triggers may produce just enough irritation to produce explosive cough.  For instance,  talking, viral and post-viral infections, allergies, laryngeal reflux, gastrointestinal reflux, and more, may flip the switch on inflamed throat nerves.

Dr. Mandel Sher and his cough doctor colleagues refer to this as “neurogenic cough” or cough hypersensitivity syndrome. There are different categories and sources of cough.  Find out from a cough doctor if your cough originates from neurogenic cough and be sure that the cough therapy is accurately matched to the cause for best results. See Dr. Sher and the Center for Cough doctors before wasting time and money or risking side effects of other cough therapy. Call today for an appointment to finally control your cough: 727-393-8067. Telehealth and in-person appointments are available.

Coughing is Natural, But is Your Cough Normal?

Normalize your cough. Don’t stop it! 

You’ve probably used the expression, “Cough it up!” While this slang usually means “hand it over or give it up,” it refers to the body’s all important cough function.  Cough has a vital role in getting rid of foreign objects before they are inhaled into our respiratory system and end-up in our lungs.  So, coughing is natural, but is your cough normal? Read more

Dr. Sher Leads National Conversation on Chronic Cough

“Cough is the most frequent illness-related reason people visit their doctor,” according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics.

But not all coughs are created equal.   Some people are dealing with an active upper respiratory infection or the aftermath, and others have a cough that just won’t go away.  A cough that lasts eight weeks or longer is considered a “chronic cough.” 10% of the population have a chronic cough and a large number from this group cannot find effective treatment because their physicians are diagnosing and treating the symptoms rather than the underlying cause. Read more

Can Talking be Contributing to your Chronic Cough?

ABC Breaking News | Latest News Videos Can talking be contributing to your Chronic Cough?  Yes!  Coughing fits from simply talking can happen to someone with an overly sensitive cough mechanism. Talking can be throat drying and act as an irritant to the cough mechanism. So, it may not be surprising that Presidential Candidate Hillary […]

AF-219: Promising New Cough Treatment

Dr. Mandel Sher and Center for Cough are the nation’s leading site for clinical research trials for new cough treatments.  Currently, Center for Cough is enrolling eligible patients in Afferent Pharmaceuticals AF-219 clinical research trial. Preliminary results suggest AF-219 may be a promising new cough treatment.

Contact Amy, Center for Cough’s Clinical Research Coordinator, to learn more about this clinical research trial and other that may be available:  727-393-8067

“…Pathologic Cough – Debilitating & Potentially Chronic Neurogenic Disorder Affecting Millions Cough is the symptom for which patients most often seek medical attention. Pathologic cough or non-productive cough serves no functional purpose, and can occur following an upper respiratory infection. In most patients, this cough manifests itself as an acute cough lasting a few weeks. However, in some patients, sensitized nerve fibers fail to return to a normal quiescent state, resulting in sub-acute or chronic cough lasting months to years. The prevalence of chronic cough is estimated to be over 10% of adults in the U.S. While an underlying etiology may contribute to cough in some of these patients (such as GERD, asthma, COPD, etc.), many patients are not well-controlled for their cough even with treatment for such underlying etiology, or with the addition of currently available cough medications…” read more

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